Tag Archives: women

New Book Release – Sharing Stories on Our Autism Journey


June is a great month. It official marks summer break from school, as well as the first day of Summer. It is also my birth month, which is why I decided to publish The Road I’ve Traveled on my birthday.

The Road I’ve Traveled is now available for pre-order on Amazon. Its official release date will be on the 19th of June.

I absolutely love the cover. The anchor represents my time in the Navy. The color blue represents my love of the ocean, as well as autism awareness.

The Road Ive Traveled

The Road I’ve Traveled is a compilation of poems and short stories Jennifer wrote during moments of her life where she felt the need to get it all out. She writes about being in the Navy during the tragedies of 9/11, having to deploy to New York where she and her shipmates stayed in New York’s harbor for three weeks, guarding the coastline in hopes of preventing any further attacks.

She writes about loss, love, heartbreak, family. You can see the fondness she had for her grandfather as she includes a heartfelt eulogy she had written moments after his passing.

She also writes about being a single mom, as well as a mom to a child who is on the autism spectrum. The journey they have endured together has been bumpy, but they continue to plow through life, learning about autism and sensory processing disorder as they go.

You can find all of my books, recently published and upcoming, under my name and my pen name, posted on my website: www.twistedcrowpress.com/books
Or, you can find them on Amazon:
For all books published under my name, Jennifer N. Adams on Amazon, click here.
For all books published under my pen name, J. Raven Wilde on Amazon, click here.
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First mammogram


A few weeks ago I had gotten my first mammogram done. All the old wives tales the older generations of women tell us younger generations of women can be really hard on oneself. I was already feeling stressed out as I had felt a few knots in my left breast and one painful knot in my right. I made an appointment to see my doctor, who then made an appointment for me to get a mammogram to check everything out. Though I’m only 34, I’m not that young to start getting these exams done regularly.

From the stories I’ve heard from those who have gotten a mammogram done, I began to have nightmares. I picture an old dinosaur aged machine that was going to smash the life out of my tatas. I was also worried about my results after having the mammogram done as cancer runs heavily in my family on both sides.

I was led into a small room with this huge machine that didn’t appear to look anything I imagined it to be. Oddly I felt more comfortable. Maybe it was due to the welcoming conversation I was having with my nurse. She adjusted the machine to my level of height and had me place one of my girls on this cold metal slab. She then started turning some knobs on the machine, bring this plastic tray looking thing down on top of my girl, which squeezed it just slightly. I had to move my head out of the view of the xray camera, which had me standing a little awkward and had me pressing my ribs into the machine slightly which was the only uncomfortable feeling I had during the entire exam.

After about a half hour of waiting on my results the doctor came in to say she couldn’t find anything, but she was going to have me go get an ultrasound. It seems that the knots I have are too small to read on the mammogram xrays. Another ten minutes and I was walking with another nurse into the ultrasound room. Being a mom I was already familiar with this device and started to relax more. Though as I was laying there, watching the screen as she moved the wand over my breasts, she hit the knot, causing me to jump. She then slowed the movement and pressed in, trying to find it the knot on the screen. Now this was the most painful part of the whole procedure.

I held my breath and tried hard not to jump as she kept running the wand over the already inflamed area. Finally she found it on the screen, but wasn’t done with me yet. She had to hold the wand over the knot and take pictures of it, documenting where it was located and how big it was. She told me that it was a cyst and that was a good thing. The cyst however can grow or reduce.

After several uncomfortable minutes later she moved to the other breast. She didn’t have me jumping as badly as she had before as this side wasn’t nearly as sensitive as the other. Though I had two knots on this breast, she couldn’t find them. She had to get the doctor to come in and have a look to see if she would be successful. After another few minutes of the doctor searching she told me that it wasn’t anything to worry about, that it could just be breast pain and inflamed ducts and that’s the reason why it isn’t showing up on the ultrasound. What a relief. Then she had to take a look at the cyst. Oh joy! Just when I thought that part was over. She was more generous to me then the nurse and didn’t use as much pressure when going over the knot.

Once she found it, they took more pictures, then told me that it is too small to do anything with and that she wants me to come back in another six months to have another look at it. She said cyst can be quite painful, but if it gets worse or get any bigger to come in earlier.

It was an interesting exam, not what I had expected from hearing my Gram’s and her sisters tell me about their experiences in having a mammogram done. I’m still curious, why isn’t there a better method of having these exams done? We as a whole have bettered our technology by way of phone and computers, but haven’t found better methods in bettering women’s exams than the already outdated techniques.

How Shall I Address You?


A blog post for my online French class:

“Last year, the French government stopped using mademoiselle on official documents. Now, all women are referred to with madame. In the English speaking world, Ms. was created as an alternative without government action.  In your post address what you think these different approaches indicate about French and American cultures.”

Miss, Ms., and Mrs. are all titles for women to define one marital status. Miss is simply for a single, unmarried woman. Ms. is for a woman who is divorced, widowed, or perhaps doesn’t wish to disclose her marital status. And Mrs. is for a married woman. I myself have never used Miss. Even though I’ve never married, I use Ms. I am a mother and think it is only fitting to use Ms. But at what age do you start using Ms., rather than Miss?

In France women of adult age won’t have to worry about figuring that out anymore. According to BBC News, France Prime Minister Francois Fillion says, “Women will no longer be forced to describe themselves.” France has done away with calling women Mademoiselle and will begin calling all women Madame, married or not.

I remember watching one of my favorite French films, Apres Vous, where Daniel Auteuil’s character asks a woman, “Madame o Mademoiselle?” He was sent by a friend to find his friend’s ex-girlfriend. When he finds his friend’s ex-girlfriend he simply asks her, Madame or Mademoiselle to see if she has since married. Her reply is, “Mademoiselle.”

I guess it would’ve been simpler to ask if she was married, but that may be considered rude since they’ve never met before. Here in America I can assume it’s easier just to ask if the woman is married or not, instead of asking how she should be called, Ms. or Mrs.

Women’s personal titles have been used for years, not just in America, but all over the world. To me it’s a use of respect. Women this day and age are more independent. Not a lot of women are married. I’ve been on my own since I was eighteen and majority of that time I’ve been single. Maybe it’s a good thing what France is doing, allowing all women to be on an equal level instead of defining their marital status.  

Along Came A Spider…


The other day I had gone to the store to pick up a prescription for my grandmother. I was lucky that it wasn’t rush hour just yet, because what happened next had taken my mind off of driving and sent my heart and anxiety racing.

I was halfway across the bridge that goes over the overpass when I felt a slight tickle on my arm. I didn’t really pay any mind to it, thinking it was just a hair. The tickling started to go up my arm, causing me to look. A spider was making its way up my arm. I swatted at it, though missing it, causing it to fall to the floor. I quickly looked in the floor for it, all the while driving down the road. There was no evidence of the spider anywhere.

I continued to drive back to my house, but with the funniest feeling that something was crawling on me…it was my mind playing tricks. As soon as I pulled into my driveway and put my car in park I searched the car over, not finding that little eight legged creature anywhere. Where did it go? I’m sure I scared it as much as it scared me, so it must be hiding waiting until it was safe for it to come out.

Several days later, I still have not found it, nor has any other spider come out to pester me.