Tag Archives: children with autism

A Busy Year It Has Been


It has been a year since I had made my last blog post and what a busy year it has been. The last few semesters of college was quite tough, rough, and stressful, but I had survived them, receiving my Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology. I had also moved my work status from intern to full-time Assistant Curator at one of the museums located in Little Rock.

This past November my grandmother was diagnosed with stage 4 pancreatic cancer, to which she had succumbed from this past August. Those several months was hard to endure, not only watching her suffer through this disease and the chemo treatments, but the family drama I had to suffer through during this time was really rough.

My daughter and I had also moved and I was quite happy that her transition to her new school was not as bad as it was when she transitioned from Pre-K to Kindergarten. Not only did we move into a new house, but she moved into a whole new school; this one being much, much smaller than her previous school, so that helped. There were a few rough days, and I know there are more rough days for her in the future, but all-in-all, she is doing well and has quite a support team to help her along the way.

During all that, I had finished up the last rough draft, the last edits of my young adult fantasy fiction and hope to have it published within the next month or so. I have found an awesome illustrator to work on the cover, to which I have seen and even though it isn’t entirely finished, I love the work she has done. (I plan on post a picture of the cover art once it is completed)

I had also written a few short stories and a novella, some of them were published and some of them are in the works of being published. All of my work can be found on this website: www.twistedcrowpress.com

To keep posted on when my young adult fantasy fiction novel will be published, or to keep posted on all future works, go to my Facebook page and click ‘like’:    www.facebook.com/AuthorJenniferNAdams

There were some few road blocks, but I had managed through each one and am starting to get everything back on track.

~JA~

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When It Storms


Sometimes it’s hard to be the adult when you’re a parent. I like to act more childish than my daughter at times, though that’s only around her. I enjoy making her laugh, it lightens my heart.

These past few days we’ve been enduring thunderstorms. My daughter is frightened of the thunder…most children are. Every time there’s a loud noise or something that scares her, she’ll run into the hallway. There she finds it safe, probably because there aren’t any windows and it seems more closed in.

When I was growing up we moved around a lot; most of those places were in tornado alley. Every time we had a thunderstorm or tornado warnings and/or watches, my youngest two sisters and I would find shelter under the kitchen table. This was honestly the safest place we could find in our tiny house. We actually turned our kitchen table into a fort. We would turn the chairs around so that the backs would be right up against the table. Then we would hang blankets over the back of the chairs, then place pillows around the back of the chair legs. We made it comfortable and dark, though we always made sure to bring a handful of flashlights with us, as well as books and snacks. Meanwhile, our mother would be in the living room, listening to the weather on the TV, to which we could hear from where we were, under the table. We would stay under there until the storm went away.

That was twenty-five years ago, give or take a year or two, when my sisters and I made our thunderstorm fort. Lately when a thunderstorm comes through, my daughter and I would sit on the couch together, far from the window. I would watch TV, while she would have her headphones on, playing with her Kindle. Yesterday she kept complaining about the thunder. It rumbled so loud, it made the house shake. And each time it would thunder, she would dart off into the hallway. She finally just hung out there for awhile. She looked sad and depressed, not to mention she left her kindle on the couch, so she was also bored. I decided to join her, but with toys, pillows, her kindle, her portable DVD player, and some blankets. I made us a little pad, partially in the hallway, where we stayed until the storms left our area.

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Blue is for National Autism Awareness Day


Blue is the color that represents Autism and today is National Autism Awareness Day. People all over the world are ‘lighting it up blue’ to show support or to honor someone they know with Autism. A lot of people are wearing blue today for the same reason.

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Today My daughter and I wore blue, as well as some of my friends. Those that work at my daughter’s daycare wore blue, as well as light up a blue light bulb and a string of blue rope lights.

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For more information on how you can light it up blue, or learn more about it, click here.

Image found on google images

Image found on google images

 

Since becoming a parent, I never thought I would have to say…


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Caught trying to sneak presents from under the tree.

Since my daughter’s Autism and Sensory Processing Disorder diagnoses, I have been spending a lot of time researching information on the two. I spend some time reading up about each one on Facebook groups specified for both disorders. Each child with Autism are different from one another, though they do have a few similarities. Spinning, meltdowns, self-hitting, rocking, hand flapping, to name a few that many Autistic children share with one another. That is why there’s a spectrum. One child can have a few autistic behaviors, but is still diagnosed as Autism, he/she is then put on one end of the autism spectrum. While another child has every one of the autistic behaviors, he/she is then put on the opposite spectrum as the other child.

I have learned that there are two sides to Sensory Processing Disorder, the either/or. Either they don’t like to be touched, or they can’t get enough of it. Either they can’t work puzzles or ride a bike, or they excel at it. Either they will only eat certain foods and very little of them (picky eaters), or they will eat everything in sight. Though both sides of SPD has similarities, doesn’t like loud noises, crowded places, won’t take naps or have a hard time going to sleep at night. They’re also excessive risk takers, such as jumping off of something and at times landing on the knees.

One thing that I have noticed from reading the support groups on FB, is that children with SPD has an odd behavior where they lick everything. At first I thought my daughter was the only one with this behavior. But after a post that was written stating ‘the one thing they never thought they would have to say to their child as a parent’. Many parents answered mostly the same thing, having to tell their child to stop licking this or that. We all found something our children have in common. Some parents commented that they thought their child was the only one that licked everything in sight. But after reading each comment, it was easy to see our child wasn’t alone in this behavior.

It’s at least fifty times a day I would have to tell my daughter to stop licking something, especially if we’re out and about. She will lick chairs, the grocery buggy, her TV, the table, her toys, the couch, just to name a few. She’ll even walk up and lick me. She also has to lap up the bathwater. I know what you’re thinking, “Ew gross!” I have the same reaction, especially when it comes to the grocery buggy and bathwater. I carry wipes to clean the buggy, though that sometimes doesn’t help as she’s gotten sick a few times from them. I do keep an eye on her and catch her in time. I carry suckers or candy with me for her to pop in her mouth, rather than the alternative.

Even though my daughter has a disorder, she is still a child. There’s quite a list of things I tell her to stop doing or not do that parents tell their children without disabilities or disorders, such as,  ‘stop jumping on your bed’, ‘stop jumping on the couch’, ‘stop running in the house’, ‘no throwing things in the house, you’ll break something’. Children with ASD and/or SPD are like any other child, just with a few extra things us parents have to tend to or look out for.

Weekly photo challenge: Beginning


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The beginning of a new friendship

Since my daughter started doing hippotherapy (therapeutic riding) this past summer, she has a new found friendship with each horse she rides. Though in the picture she is seen leaning in to kiss a horse named Peaches, she usually rides another horse named Gilly.

Hippotherapy has helped her open up more with her confidence in horses and most other animals, as well as helped her open up with her speech. Up until the age of three she had barely an eight word vocabulary, whereas most kids that age has three times that many words in their vocabulary.

Hippotherapy helps keep her calm and relaxed to the point where she can use that energy to focus on other things, such as seeing the world around her and telling us about what she sees. When she isn’t riding, she is mostly focused on one thing and has to have help in redirecting her attention to something else.

Now that she is four years old, she has started talking more and is using actual sentences. She still babbles a lot, but it is the effort in trying to say what she has to say that counts.