Tag Archives: artwork

Weekly Photo Challenge: Wall


For more of this week’s photo challenge, wall, check out The Daily Post.

Last month, I visited one of my favorite book stores, Gingles Books and Baubles. It had been awhile since I’ve been there and I had stopped to search for a few books for a couple of classes. When I arrived, I noticed a huge, beautiful wall mural, covering the entire wall of the building (old Bell building) across the street from the book store (South Street). I walked over towards it and noticed that it’s actually a painting of the history of Arkansas and quite possible, some of it depicted history in the town of Benton (Niloak pottery).

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Spanish conquistador, Hernando de Soto traveled through Arkansas in 1541-42, when he had encountered the Quapaws, in the city known today as Parkin. For more information on de Soto’s travels through Arkansas, click here.

*Please note, the tribe depicted in the mural is Caddo. In Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca’s book Castaways, he was the first Spaniard to encounter the Caddos. Hernando de Soto died in May 1942, having never met with the Caddos. It was his successor, Luis Moscoso de Alvarado, who after de Soto’s death, followed along the Red River, into Southwest Arkansas, where the Caddo tribe flourished. For more info on the remainder of the de Soto expedition, click here.

Arkansas is also known for it’s timbers and timber mills, as well as it’s diamonds in Murfreesboro, and bauxite ore found in Bauxite. Arkansas had a hand in helping the US military during both WWI and WWII. Aluminum comes from bauxite ore and the town of Bauxite has an abundance of it.

Arkansas was also known for its pottery called Niloak, which is kaolin spelled backwards. Kaolin is the type of find grade clay found here in Benton, Arkansas. It was popular in 1909 to 1946. Niloak had a hard time making it through the depression, but it was successful during WWII when they produced over a million clay pigeons for the military. After the war, the company hit another downfall and it sadly went out of business.

The mural artwork was done by Dianne Roberts, who was hired by the Gann Museum to paint the mural. You can check out their FB pages by clicking on their names and see pictures she used to help her create her beautiful mural.

Sadly, Books and Baubles will be closing it’s doors for good in April, unless a new owner can step forward and keep it open. Click here, for more information.

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One Word Photo Challenge: Teal


This week’s One Word Photo Challenge is Teal; a beautiful shade found on the color spectrum of blue, can be found in the pictures posted below.

If you have never known the love of a therapy horse, or have seen the love expressed between horse and rider, then hopefully you can see that and more expressed in the photos.

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The ever so patient horse, encouraging the ever so gentle touch from a child with special needs is awe inspiring. Tears well up in my eyes with happiness, as I watch my daughter’s slow movements in her approach towards her therapy horse, Passion, who is moving in closer to my daughter for her to touch.

Horse/equine therapy, also known as Hippotherapy, has been very helpful with my daughter in teaching her to express herself more. Not only that, but it allows her to have a love for animals that she didn’t have before; she had expressed fear when any animal approached her, whether that animal was calm or not.

She expresses a giddy, “Hi, Passion.” before reaching up to brush her fingertips across Passion’s nose. Passion, a gentle therapy horse on Harmony In Hooves Farm, stands up to her name. Her gentle, calm nature would allowing anyone a chance to pet her. Horses can be very therapeutic and just being around her can be very calming.

You can check out my other blog post for more information on how horses can be therapeutic for special needs children.

The following photos is of some artwork pieces found in Bernice Gardens in North Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Letters


I found this park bench, sitting outside a computer store, in Sheridan, Arkansas. They painted it to look like a computer as a way to advertise their business. I thought it was neat and took a picture of it.

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My children’s book cover art has been completed


Yesterday, I opened my email and to my surprise I received an email from my editor, showing me a picture of the cover art to my children’s book. I was excited to see it! He told me to pick one of the two options that he emailed me and to let them know which one I wanted for the book cover.

I looked at both of them several times, but it was easy to pick which one that I liked best. I then asked my grandma to come and take a look and see which one she liked best. She had picked the one that I liked as well. It wasn’t a hard choice to make.

One of the pictures the artwork popped out at me. It was bright and colorful compared to the other one. The other artwork was hard to read the title because it was in black and white. It didn’t match the rest of the artwork. I quickly emailed my editor, telling him which one I had chosen.

I wish that I could share with you the cover art, but I was told not to…yet. They want me to wait until the cover has been finalized. I can understand that. Not to mention I wanted to wait myself, something about the anticipation of the surprise seems more exciting. Its kind of like going to a movie you haven’t seen before with someone who has seen it. The element of surprise is ruined when they begin to tell you what happens before it happens. I love surprises. I love going to a movie or watching a TV show without knowing what happens until it happens.  

It is getting closer and closer to production, the part that I’m anxiously awaiting. I’m not sure what makes me feel giddier, the closer I get for my book being complete or the part that comes after that. I’ll find out at the end of this month.