Monthly Archives: December 2013

Weekly Photo Challenge: Joy


This weeks photo challenge is supposed to be about joy. I think every picture, well almost every picture, I take of my daughter represents some form of joy. Here is a picture I took myself of her with Christmas lights. The night of Christmas I drove around town and through the back roads into the country, showing her houses decorated in brightly colored lights and other Christmas decorations. To hear her gasps and repeatedly say how pretty each house was made my night.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Community


This weeks photo challenge is community. What better to show community than pictures of sailors working and living together on board a ship. Over 5000 crew live on board during a 6 month deployment. A carrier has all the essentials to be called a floating city – barber shop, ship store, post office, many gyms, laundry mat, church, and many other things.

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Wacky Wednesday


This week my daughter’s daycare is having ‘Spirit Week’. Monday was Red and Green day, Tuesday was Ugly Sweaters, and today is Wacky Wednesday. The wearer’s outfit is not suppose to match, so two different socks, polka dot shirt with stripped pants, that sort of thing.

I opened my daughter’s drawers to look for something ‘interesting’ or ‘wacky’. I looked at her and told her she needed to wear something silly today for school. She then helped me pick something out for her to wear – her Supergirl costume with a red tutu. Looks wacky, yet awesome!

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Toilets Aren’t Always So Wonderful


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I woke up this morning to the sound of a toilet being flushed. A few seconds later I heard my daughter shouting, “My toy!” I cringed as I quickly jumped out of bed and headed towards the bathroom. Lately my daughter has been flushing items down the loo. I’ve been trying to tell her that mommy can’t retrieve whatever she flushes down the potty, so once she sticks it in there and pulls the handle to flush it, it’s gone forever.

I walk in the bathroom and immediately she’s pointing at the potty saying, “My toy! My toy!” I tell her once again, “It’s gone baby. Don’t you remember mommy telling you, once you flush something down the potty, it isn’t coming back?” She only stares at me with a frown, then looks at the potty and starts to cry. I pick her up and remind her again that she has to stop flushing things.

I thought I was being clever and putting one of those door knob covers on the bathroom door. I had removed it off of her bedroom door, thinking it was okay. I had not thought about the bathroom door being left open during the night as my grams and I routinely use the bathroom. My daughter is usually the first to get up. Obviously she saw I had removed her door knob cover and let herself out of her room.

I know that there are potty locks, but where do I find one? I’ve searched a few stores, Target and Walmart, but haven’t seen any. I didn’t want to keep the bathroom locked as I want my daughter to be able to let herself into the bathroom to use the potty. A lot of times I cannot be in there, hovering over her, waiting on her to actually pee. Those with kids know how that usually goes. She has her very own little potty, but she has a habit of flushing things down the bigger potty as well as turning the facet water on and washing stuff down that pipe too.

What is Mithraism


historical view of Heidelberg

historical view of Heidelberg (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In Sociology class we are learning a little bit about religion in society. One particular religion that we discussed, other than Christianity, was sun worship. How ancient societies would worship the sun, until science came along and explained the world and it’s surroundings to us. I wrote a response paper on a particular sun worshiping group that I had seen on a TV show a few months ago. I had to do some research to make sure what I was saying was accurate, as always. Enjoy!

I love watching the History channel. Some of the shows on there always catch my attention, especially when it comes to talking about historical items in the museum, archeology, or historical exploration. Last year I started watching a show called America Unearthed. Scott Wolter, a world renowned forensic geologist is often called to check out some rock or stone someone has found. Usually that stone has some history relevance to a past society or tied to a particular group of people.

According to Wolter’s show, “these groups of people or societies are relatively known to have lived there, so history says, but with the evidence that’s being found today and the evidence that’s been looked at again from the past, says otherwise. Such as the Mayan’s built temples in Georgia, Egyptian tribes once lived in Oklahoma, the Knights Templar roaming in the Nevada desert. All of these groups of people past history says is inaccurate, but evidence being brought forth shows otherwise.”

The show is primarily based on correcting the history that we’ve been taught in school. Scott Wolter travels all over America, even across Europe, trying to put an answer to some of the items that are brought to his attention.

In Sociology class, we talked about a particular religion where people worship the sun. It reminded me of an episode I saw of America Unearthed called ‘A Deadly Sacrifice’. Evidence of a particular group called Mithraism was found in Oklahoma. Wolter says, “Mithraism is an ancient Egyptian cult of the Apis bull.” However, that is incorrect.

Mithraism was it was a secretive sect. It is part of the Zoroastrianism religion that was founded in the 6th century BC. What is known is that it dates back to the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD.  

Mithras was a very important Persian god. He was a sun god and a bull slayer. Images are often found of Mithras slaying a bull. It is believed that those in the Mithraism sect sacrificed a bull to honor Mithras, but the blood was used to baptized newcomers.  

This particular group would have been outcast in America as they were very different from Christianity. However, archeological evidence shows that Christianity and Mithraism influenced one another. They both developed in the same area of the world. They both have communal meals and have similar beliefs and practices. It is believed that Christianity adopted one aspect of Mithraism, Christmas Day.

Jesus Christ was not born on December 25th; he was born sometime in the fall. December 25th is the day of the birth of the sun, or the sun god, to which is closely related to Mithras.

When Constantine converted to Christianity from Mithraism, he decided to change December 25th to Christ’s birthday, rather than Mithras’ birthday. Mithraism eventually died out in the 4th century AD when Constantine converted to Christianity.

This post is being brought to my attention and is not at all seen as what I was trying to get across. It seems that I will have to correct some errors.

Growing up with Autism


I’ve started to notice my daughter’s Autism progressing more. She’s more sound sensitive, even more scared of the washer, blender, and vacuum cleaner than she was before. The sounds of fireworks terrify her to the point she’s screaming with fright. She’s even more attractive to things with bright, flashing lights, like glow sticks or the light up wands you would find at Halloween or at concession stands at parades or carnivals.

Last night we had our Christmas parade here in Bryant, my hometown. I didn’t take her due to her reaction to the Christmas parade we went to in Benton the night before;  Benton is the town next to us. She showed interest in the floats, decorated with bright Christmas lights, with cheerful people waving and shouting ‘Merry Christmas’. My daughter cheered and waved back at each one as they passed by us. Then she started to push away when the band started coming near us. I calmly walked behind the crowd of people that was around us, but started to dance along with the band’s music, showing her that it was okay.

As soon as the band passed by I put her up on top of my shoulders, where she would sit for majority of the parade. She resumed her clapping, waving, and cheering at the brightly lit floats driving past us, until the motorcycles started to approach us. She started to scream and try to climb down from my shoulders. I cuddled her as best I could, trying to comfort her as she hid her head in my chest, covering her ears and whimpering. I placed my hand over her head, bringing her into my chest and covering her ears as best as I could, telling her all will be okay. The more the motorcycles revved up their engines, the more she stirred and cried.

I continued to stay at the back of the crowd, far from the parade procession. Though as each loud group that passed by us, I would put her back up on my shoulders so she could enjoy the rest of the parade. It was soon coming to an end and it was time for the firetrucks to make their appearance, followed by the fat jolly man on top of the last firetruck. It wasn’t hard to tell they were nearing as each one would blast their sirens, causing it to echo off of the buildings, making it sound louder and louder as the approached. It was our Que to leave.

I didn’t need to stay any longer to see Santa and I knew she could care less if he was approaching or not. It was the loud sirens that had her terrified and her wanting to leave. So leave we did. She loves firetrucks, has several firetruck toys at home. She just doesn’t like the loud sirens that they have.

Children don’t come with handbooks or manuals, nor does Autism. It’s all a learning process. A few years ago I had to learn from these similar reactions that fireworks aren’t something that we’ll be into viewing each fourth of July. Every fourth we’ll go to the carnival, but we return home way before the crowd shows for the fireworks display. I try to distract her with cartoons, puzzles, and games on her kindle as each whistle, pop, and crackle noise is made from the neighbors setting off their own little fireworks.

Parades and fireworks won’t stop us from enjoying ourselves. We might not go off to watch it in person, but that won’t stop us from finding something else to entertain ourselves, such as a Disney movie in the comfort of our own home.

I’m still here


I have not abandoned my blog, nor you, my followers. It has been a rough few months in my household, between my daughter and I passing head colds and the stomach bug back and forth, I think we’re both on the way to recovery. I swear that if only I had gotten sick more often as a child, I would not be getting sick as often as I am now. Though with my daughter’s weak immune system and being in daycare, I guess it’s only natural that I catch whatever she gets.

This week is the last full week of classes. Next week is all about finals, finals, finals. I have filled out my graduation paperwork, as I have one more semester left until I get my Associate’s Degree. Then I am off to the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, where I will be working on my Bachelor’s Degree in Anthropology. I am already looking forward to getting away from the basic freshman, sophomore classes and taking the real classes that have to do with my future career.

As soon as I am done with this semester, and on winter break, I will be picking up the slack on my writing. I have started working on a children’s book on hippo-therapy. I’m anxious to have it completed soon. I think I will be looking for a different publisher though. I just have a few issues and complaints, mostly with shipping and distributing, but other than that, the rest of the team is great. It’s still hard seeing my book out there under someone else who shares the same name as me. I had hoped that it would’ve been corrected by now, but it hasn’t. So, if you see my book Dana’s First Fish out there on the internet, it is me, just not my picture and bio; that’s the other author Jennifer Adams who also writes children’s books. What’s odd is that my picture and bio is on the back cover of the book, so it’s easy to see who the actual author is.

I hope to be back on here writing full time, just waiting to be done with finals week first. Hope everyone is staying warm and having a great holiday season.